Book review: Indistractable

Author: Nir Eyal
Subtitle: How to Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life

TLDR; Being indistractable is a superpower of people leaving happy lives according to their own values and beliefs. In his book, Nir Eyal gives everything you need to understand and gain that power to change your own life for the better.

The author

Nir is the author of Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products and Indistractable: How to Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life. He was taught as a Lecturer in Marketing at the Stanford Graduate School of Business and Design School, and sold two technology companies since 2003.

Nir worked in the video gaming and advertising industries where he learned and applied the techniques used to motivate and manipulate users. He writes to help companies create behaviors that benefit their users while educating people on how to build healthful habits in their own lives.

For whom?

This book is for anybody, who wants to live their own life, aligned with own values and driven by conscious choices.

How to read

Nir was kind enough and gave precise recommendation on this, so I have nothing to add there.

You’re welcome to navigate the four steps to becoming indistractable however you like, but I recommend you proceed in order through parts one to four.

That’s what I did, and have zero regrets. However, if you don’t like to read books in order or prefer learning by examples, Nir covered you as well:

If you’re the kind of person who likes to learn by exmpalpe, and you want to see these tactics in action first, feel free to read parts fine and on, then come back through the first four parts for a deeper explanation.

My impression

I was impressed by the amount of great reviews at the beginning of the book. There are several pages of them, but I was already hooked by reading the first several reviews.

The book is very well-structured and easy to follow. Relatively short chapters allow getting joy from the book step by step. It’s nice that each chapter ends with Remember this section holding the major ideas, so it will be easy to quickly refresh some key points in memory. In addition to that, there is a Chapter Takeaways section at the end of the book for a supersonic look back.

Language used in the book is of high quality, in my opinion, it is very expressive and precise. I’m not a native speaker and had to use a translator from time to time to get more accurate meaning of some words, which is good for me as I learned some new words phrases.

I liked a lot the model of traction and distraction presented in the book, and was surprised that modern tech is not the source of the distraction problem, but human brain is. It was also interesting to read how brain structures and behaviors which helped us to survive over the ages are preventing us from feeling comfort for too long.

Furthermore, there are enough tips on how to explore distractions, deal with internal and external triggers, and stay focused on what really matters. Ideas and tools mentioned in the book look simple and obvious (after you read them), yet insightful at the same time. It’s easy to try them out, and I’ve already started validating them on practice. Don’t have enough results to share yet, but I’m very excited at the moment and curious where I will get to in the next months.

Favorite quotes

Sharing my favorite quotes as is, and letting you make your own conclusions.

Living the life we want requires not only doing the right things; it also requires we stop doing the wrong things that take us off track.

It’s good to know that feeling bad isn’t actually bad; it’s exactly what survival of the fittest intended.

While we can’t control the feelings and thoughts that pop into our heads, we can control what we do with them.

you are only powerless if you think you are.

Think of all the locks, security systems, and storage units we use to protect our property and how little we do to protect our time.

You can’t call something a distraction unless you know what it’s distracting you from.

Staying late at work or feeling pressured to reply to work-related messages after hours means spending less time with our family and friends or doing something for ourselves.


This review is barely a tip of the iceberg. I encourage you getting the book (FYI, I’m not affiliated), reading it from cover to cover, and becoming the main stakeholder in your life!

Now: Dec 26th, 2021

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“Now” – the magic moment in time which will never happen twice in your life. It’s shared by billions of people on Earth but still unique for every individual. In this post, I want to capture my very own “now” and share it with you. It’s all about me and my life, so proceed reading if you are interested in day-to-day details. As always, it’s ok to skip if you are not at that place now.

I’ve heard about the idea of “now” page from my blogging group fellows and liked it a lot but was putting aside for a while to focus on writing about leadership, software development and books. I’m at the end of the year and sort of trying to slow down a bit after a long, challenging and eventful year. That in my opinion makes a good timing for “now” post. So where I am now?

I am at my home now (the rented apartment at the northern part of Moscow), in my office (cozy corner in the living room), writing in the dark room (it’s less than 5pm, but already dark). 

The Christmas tree is all set up and lights are blinking to remind about the upcoming New Year. There are still three days of work left before the holidays, but the holiday mood is already there. I probably need to explain a bit the context specific for Russia and some other countries. Christmas is celebrated on Jan 7th, that’s why I’m not away from keyboard yet as most of my colleagues, and New Year’s Eve kicks-off a holiday season with big presents exchange happening on the New Year night.

That Christmas/New Year mood though has a bittersweet flavor this time. My daughter has got sick couple of days ago and there is not that much emotional energy left to party and celebrate. Anyway, I’m looking forward to it as a very needed break to refill my tank and jump into exciting 2022. There is still enough time for my kid to recover and for us to get prepared for a little family party.

My wife and I had a very productive year, learned a lot and have enough moments to remember. We both miss trips, but 2022 looks more promising in that regard, despite all the additional risks and unexpected changes which have been appearing since COVID times the beginning of 2020.

My work at Automattic has been an amazing adventure this year. I’m proud of what we achieved with the company as well as with teams I work closely. WooCommerce Payments has become available in 18 countries and got a ton of new features, it’s powering thousands of online stores and is helping merchants to sell their great products all over the world! It’s incredible to be part of that journey and share it with such wonderful people and professionals. There are ambitious plans for 2022, but I won’t share them here, you’ll find out yourselves either by following my or WooCommerce Payments’s updates.

I’m glad that I started writing and sharing my thoughts with people a few months ago. It’s not easy sometimes and far from ideal, but I’m happy with consistency since the beginning of the blogging experiment.

Wellbeing has become important to me recently. I started to focus more on this part of my life as well as continuing to care about other’s comfort. Thinking is not doing though, so the “doing” step needs to be improved in 2022 😀

Pausing here for now to spend some time with my family, bye!

My 2021 insights

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2021 is getting to the end and it’s a good time to reflect a bit on what happened during the last 12 months. So did I with the help of my coach and want to share a couple of interesting bits of it.

Energy

I worked hard this year at my job along with many fantastic people around me. But hard work takes energy, which consecutively affects the quality of life outside work and threatens the balance between the two. What I found out though is to maintain that balance and live a happy life I need not only effectively use my energy during the workday but also effectively restore it. Rest is as important as the work I do. Taking rest is necessary to do the work well and should be planned accordingly. 

As part of the reflection with the coach, we were also looking at my activities giving the most energy. So here are the two winners of mine: solo trips (like the one I had this year) and skiing (my new hobby). They work differently to some extent but have at least one thing in common – they create a space where I am alone without access to daily routines. Sort of escape from busy days.

We also talked about how to apply that discovery on a daily basis in 2022 so I can always have energy, but those are only ideas yet to be tested, so not sharing them for now.

Surprises

The second part of the reflection was focused on things that surprised me most this year and two things popped out of this: my personal journey at work and how well the team has coped with all the challenges.

Without going too much into internal and private details I think if somebody would present me the plan one year ago with all the things which actually happened this year, I’d say with confidence it’s not realistic or at least too optimistic. Looking back I can say that constant learning, iterative approach, and the culture built within Automattic were the key elements of that success. That’s why for 2022 I’m not trying to make any precise plans, but want to stay ambitious, adjust as the situation changes, and enjoy the journey.


That’s it, now it’s time to apply those learnings – try to stay ambitious with keeping a good energy level and avoiding burnout at the same time. I’ll let you know how it goes in 2022.

5 extra steps to take after your code works

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You’ve written that final line of code and are pretty sure it should work now, you run it to double-check the code does what you were aiming to do, aaaand… It works! Yahoo! You did it! Now it feels like a good time to commit, push for review, sit back, breathe out, celebrate a bit, and jump to the next awesome feature in your long list of fascinating ideas! But wait for a second, there might be a few more things that would be nice to do before you ship your solution.

First of all, congrats! You wrote a code that works! This is a necessary step in the process of creating software, yet not the final one. 

There is a nice post titled “Always do extra”. Although it’s focused on mastering hard skills and growing the expertise, the idea that outstanding developers always do extra steps resonated with me. Here I’m sharing five more steps great developers take after their code works.

1. Take care of the readers

Good product leaders know their customers and care about them, good writers know and care about their readers. There is a lot in common between writing and software development, so good developers know and care about their code consumers.

Any fool can write code that a computer can understand. Good programmers write code that humans can understand

Martin Fowler

That quote clearly states there are two types of consumers of your code: computers and humans. While the code you just created can be successfully digested by a computer, it works after all! Can you tell the same about other developers? Will they understand your awesome idea? How much effort is required to understand your solution?

Those are great questions to ask yourself. In most cases, software development is a team sport. You’ll improve code written by your fellows, and they will build on top of your solutions. Chances are high there are different players in your team with different skills, experience, and domain area knowledge. So it’s time to make sure the code reads well by people with different backgrounds. 

Although it may sound simple there are many things under that cover and it’s not about code style or prettifying its look, I assume there are linters and formatters already in place to automatically make sure team agreements about code style are followed. There are things like naming variables and methods, commenting on unobvious solutions or decisions, extracting pieces of functionality into reusable functions, applying the right design patterns, and many more. If you’re not familiar with those I’d recommend starting with Clean Code by Robert C. Martin (aka Uncle Bob).

If you already know the theory and have experience in making code readable, here is the tip from professional writers – take a pause before starting code cleanup and switch to something else for a while. When you get back you’ll be able to read the code with fresh eyes and more effectively spot areas for improvement.

2. Respect other contributors

Unless you just started with a clean project, the enhancement you made is not the first one to be shipped. So the reasonable question to ask yourself is are old features working after my change? I doubt your fellow developers and precious users will be happy to discover one day that the feature they love and successfully used yesterday doesn’t work anymore.

To answer that question you’d need to run some tests. How you do it depends on the state and size of the project, the specifics of the code changed, available tools, the overall dev process, and some additional factors. 

In the best case, you have a good continuous integration pipeline (CI) with a decent set of automated tests that will run every time changes are pushed into the repository and the merge will be blocked if at least one of them fails. However, even if you have them you can save your time by running locally a subset of the automated tests covering the areas of the code which might be affected by your change. This will save you from getting back to the code after CI catches some mistakes for you. But it is worth doing only if the time and effort to launch the test environment locally is relatively small, otherwise, delegate this task to CI.

If you’re not so lucky and don’t have a good CI, there are at least two things that would be nice to do. First – try to run all automated tests you have or at least test critical paths of the project which potentially might be affected by introduced changes. Second – start talking to your team about the values of CI and automated testing, you may find a few good hints in this post.

3. Protect your solution

No matter if you were lucky or not on the previous step, I hope you see the value of CI and automated testing. So it’s time to make sure your own code has some protection.

The first kind of protection – automated tests – is needed to signal other developers if they unintentionally break your code. Depending on the scope of the feature, its importance, and complexity you might need unit, integration, end-to-end tests, or a mix of them. There is no single right answer on how much and which tests you need to write, you’d need to decide on the right balance of those yourself. Ideally, tests for the happy path, some expected unhappy paths, and maybe edge cases would be added. Doing so also highlights that those unhappy paths and edge cases were taken into consideration.

Tip: thinking about how to test your code early in the process leads to less coupled and better-structured solutions. Read TDD by Example book for more thoughts and examples on this approach even if you are not going to follow the test-driven development process. 

The second kind of protection – error boundaries – is needed to prevent the whole application from exploding if there is a mistake in your code. Depending on what are you working on this kind of protection might be not needed, e.g. if unhandled exceptions are a necessary part of the solution. However, consciously thinking through them and adding or not adding catchers where necessary is worth doing.

4. Add extra clues

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There are good chances that the solution you’ve just made will be used not only by developers in your team or other teams in your org, and in the case of a popular product, there will be lots of people relying on your code. So it’s worth taking care of them as well by writing some docs, creating demos, or any other hints which would explain your solution from the product user perspective.

For example, QA folks would be happy with testing instructions to reproduce and test new changes, and end-users would be happy by getting up-to-date instructions in the product docs. Community members could benefit if a new library feature is listed in the docs with a good demo of how to apply it. 

In many cases, this step might be not needed, but creating a habit of taking a pause and thinking about it will positively impact the product. People will love your solutions and product much more if it’s clear and easy to use them.

5. Take care of reviewers

We are humans and we’re not immune to mistakes, that’s why the code review process exists, and hope you have it in your team as well. Taking some steps to help your reviewer will make the process faster and more efficient.

Here are a few things to consider:

  • Commit messages.
  • PR description. 
  • Find and ping the right reviewer.

Let’s start with commit messages. Good commit messages are a valuable source of useful information for the reviewer. Those are hints and a history of work progress on the issue. So worth reviewing them before pushing changes to the remote repository and editing where necessary. Interactive rebase is your best friend in this process.

PR description. It is usually the first thing reviewer will read to understand what’s the PR is about. They have plenty of their own work to do so it’s naive to assume that PR reviewer always has the same or more deep knowledge of the issue you were working on. Despite that lots of information could be derived from commit messages, PR description is an important element to onboard a reviewer. It’s a good idea to have a clear and concise title of the PR, a link to the issue it fixes, a short description of main changes introduced, testing instructions to run/reproduce old and new behavior, screenshots in case of visual changes, links to designs and other important discussions where key decisions were made, and so on. The key point is to save the reviewer’s time searching for all of this info to understand your work and properly review your code.

Once your PR is ready for review, the final important step towards effective review is to pick the right reviewer. Unless this process is fully automated or documented in your team you’d need to make a decision here as well. Hope by that time you have a good understanding of which parts of the codebase are affected by your changes, so requesting a review from a teammate who is familiar and knowledgeable in that domain is a good idea. Taking reviewer experience into account is also important, e.g. it would be an arguable choice to ask a new or a junior developer to solely review complex change affecting many parts of the codebase. Sometimes asking two or more people to review the changes is reasonable, especially if those are critical ones.


If you’ve done all the steps above, you must be in a good position! Go ahead and send your awesome change for the review! You’ve done a great job by taking those extra steps, however, that’s not the end of the journey yet. The code review is a really nice and interesting process and deserves its own story.

In the end, I want to share a great quote made by WordPress one day – Code is poetry. It’s not a coincidence you’re called an author even if you don’t feel like a traditional writer at all. No matter if your code is a poem, novel, short passage, or anything else, you have the readers! And it would be nice to think about them and love them as I do now while writing this post! 

Take care of the consumers of your code!

Opinion: Top 3 leadership skills

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Being a leader implies a broad set of responsibilities and requires skills that differ from individual contributors’ skills. I was thinking about it yesterday morning and then the question came to my head “what are the most important ones?”. Huh, the wheels immediately started spinning in my head trying to find the answer.  Then I remembered that limitations foster creativity (here are two posts on this topic), so I decided to add a limit of 3 skills to make the exercise even more fun. So here are the top 3 of my choice.

1. Communication

“Communication is oxygen” sounds like a mantra in my head not only because it’s part of the Automattic creed, but because I feel it with my bones. I doubt there is a leadership book exists which doesn’t mention communication as one of the top skills for leaders or managers. I also think communication is the most powerful weapon in the leader’s toolbelt.

There is a lot already said and written about it, but through this year I’ve realized that being good at communication is not just being able to speak or write well and without mistakes. It’s much more – from understanding the theory of information processing by humans to resolving conflicts, from effectively expressing yourself to listening and creating a space for others to share, from stretching people to supporting them, from mentoring and coaching individuals to learning from them, and so on. 

As you can see, communication is a very broad topic, so mastering and practicing various aspects of it will never hurt.

2. Sense of balance

Leadership is a very inaccurate science. There is no one size fits all solution and many recommendations depend on the context. That’s why I believe it’s crucial to seek, define, and regularly check the balance which works well for your case. That applies basically to everything – the amount of uncertainty affordable in the projects and processes, the amount of autonomy and control you want to have in a team, the amount of tech debt taken into sprints, the amount of time spent on learning and self-development, saying yes or no to many ideas and initiatives; the list may go very long.

No matter what was your past experience, it takes time to adjust balance in your current context, so pure curiosity, observations, and regular feedback loops are your best friends in finding the right balance.

3. Self-care

Supporting your team and its individuals is another extremely impactful way of leading the team to success. However, you won’t be able to do it well if your battery is drained. That’s why I think taking care of yourself is necessary, required, and mandatory in that role. If you like many others experience impostor syndrome or feel guilty about taking care of yourself, it’s time to reach out for support. Talk to your lead, talk to your peers, consider working with a coach or a therapyst, because sometimes it’s really hard to cope with. And last but not least don’t forget that simple aircraft instruction “Put the mask on yourself first”.


Note: this is purely my opinion as of today, after being more than one year in that role with a fully distributed team, after experiencing a team growth from 4 to 12 people, after experiencing a team split, team focus shift, delivering multiple projects, switching team focus, talking to and learning from many great leads, mentors, and coaches around me.

I’m curious what would be your top 3, so I would be happy if you share them in the comments under the post.

Voice behind the blog

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I’m pretty new to blogging but what I like about it so far is that it’s a great way of sharing an individual perception of reality. That’s why I think the author’s identity is an essential part of the blog. That’s why many blogs have an “About” page and it’s a great way of getting familiar a bit with the author of the posts you read and hopefully enjoy.

Another great thing about people is they are very different and creative by nature and that applies to their blogs and about pages as well. However, so far I’ve seen only text and images as the most common content on the about page, mine about page is not exclusion. That’s perfectly fine, especially if you like me have the good old stereotype that “blogging is writing and writing is text and images”. However, Blogging for beginners course by WordPress.com Courses and folks at Automattic, challenged that setting in my head, and I realized it’s not like that anymore. Somehow my brain ignored the fact that video-based services like YouTube, Instagram (to some extent), Tik-Tok, and so on have millions of content creators who are bloggers. Podcasts became very popular too and can be considered voice-based blogging! So why not use voice, audio, and video in the classical web-based blog?! Why not use other media in addition to text and image on the About page to share your identity with readers and establish a better connection?! I don’t have a good answer for you 😛

So here we are, got to the point and the key purpose of this post – to connect the dots and give you a chance to hear the voice behind the blog. I don’t know yet if I’ll make audio recordings of the following posts, but I smile every time when I imagine how my voice sounds in your head while you read the posts.

Thanks for listening/reading and hope you’re not annoyed by the voice 🙂

Output vs Outcome

TLDR; Working hard and working smart are not the same things. The first ensures a lot of work is done, the second – moves you forward to the desired destination. Focus on what really matters can significantly boost individual/team/company effectiveness.

Last week I’ve read this post from The ReadMe Project about effective communication which resonated with me. The gist is that truly effective communication leads to the desired outcome rather than desired output. I think this rule could and should be applied to many other things as well: the code we write, the decisions we make, the projects we lead, the products we create, the actions or inactions we make, and so on.

The key difference between the two to my understanding is the output designates the artifact of the work like feature, document, message, post, etc, while the outcome defines the desired impact you want to achieve like improved user experience, change in the audience behavior, metric growth and so on. That’s why the outcome is what really matters and not the output.

I’m not saying the output is not important; on the contrary, I believe the output is very important. However, most of the time the outcome can be achieved in several different ways but often people focus on the output they planned to create and forget about the desired outcome, or don’t think about it at all. So far I’ve seen two very common patterns: doing something without thinking about the outcome and losing the focus on the outcome in the process. 

Not thinking about the outcome

This is usually caused by the too-narrow thinking which might have many various reasons underneath it ranging from not enough experience to dangerous not my problem mentality. In simple cases, the situation could be improved by clarifying the context for the activity, organizing learning or mentorship, or providing feedback. In complex cases, a more thorough investigation is needed to find the root of the problem and work with it.

Losing focus in the process

This applies to longer activities like projects, roadmaps, etc. Before the kick-off, at the planning phase, it’s quite common to keep the final purpose in mind to define what output is required to achieve the project goals. However, in the execution phase, that sense of initial purpose vanishes very soon and, if completely lost, can often lead to irrational or even wrong decisions. 

There are two key reasons for this: different levels of thinking and different levels of involvement from people between planning and execution phases. The planning phase assumes strategic thinking and deeper involvement from leadership (explicit or implicit), while the execution phase requires tactical thinking and deeper involvement from the implementation team.

To maintain the focus on outcome and make it part of the team or organization culture there are a few simple things needed:

  1. Create context for people operating on the tactical level. Make sure they understand the desired outcome and indicators of success. Worth mentioning is that the outcome is more important than output.
  2. Make the outcome a part of the progress tracking. First of all, it’s important to track the progress of the longer initiatives, so if you don’t do this yet it’s time to think about it. Second, make sure the desired outcome is part of the tracking progress, either via metrics or as a reminder of what you’re trying to achieve in the end.
  3. Reiterate the final goal/mission regularly to refresh it in people minds.

Although things above look simple, doing them consistently is tough, but only consistency will be able to build a new habit with time.

Examples

Output thinking

We should ship a new payment method X by the end of the month.

Outcome thinking

We help merchants and shoppers in Europe to sell and buy with their favorite payment method by adding a new payment method X to our product.

I need to create a weekly/monthly/quarterly report for my manager.

I’m providing the summary to my manager so they can do their work more effectively.

I need to gather feedback from peers and stakeholders.

I’m trying to make a better decision by incorporating the knowledge, experience, and unique perspective of my peers and stakeholders.

Validation

How do I know if somebody, including myself, is focused on the outcome over output? One of the best ways to check this is a five whys technique. Although the technique is originally intended to get to the root of the problem in this case it helps to see if you sense the root of intention:

  1. What am I doing at the moment and what should be the result of the activity? => Output.
  2. Why this result is important? => Outcome 1.
  3. Why outcome 1 is important? => Outcome 2.
  4. Why …

Ideally, after a few iterations, you should see the movement towards the mission statement (personal, team, or company). If it’s not happening, that it’s a good signal to step back and rethink if the task or even the whole project is still relevant, but that’s another story.


That’s it, I encourage you to raise your awareness about the outcomes you’re trying to achieve as it’s what really matters in the end.

Success diary – a simple tool with multiple powers

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TLDR; Are you lacking confidence? Don’t feel satisfied with your daily progress? Struggling with providing positive feedback to your reports, peers, or managers? You should try success diary practice! Every day, even the tough one, has positive moments and elements of success. Training yourself to spot it can help you in many ways!

Some time ago I was reading Bodo Shaeffer’s book “A dog called Money”. Despite being a very good book for kids and adults about dealing with money it mentions a fantastic tool called “success diary”. You need to write down at least 5 elements of success every day and that’s it. The idea sounds simple, isn’t it? But the power is huge, especially for leaders.  In the book, the diary was aiming to improve the self-confidence of a person, but after practicing it myself for almost a year I’m pretty sure it gives much more than that.

Success diary powers

Reflection 

Reflection is a great practice helping to increase awareness, performance and boost growth. While doing exercise you create a space for yourself to step back, look at your day and observe it in a different way. I was surprised how many great things could go unnoticed in the flow of tasks without such a reflection. 

Positive focus

Since you’re intentionally looking for success you tune your brain to search for it and filter out everything not matching “your request”. By doing so you train the brain to spot success even in small things.

Acknowledgment

By writing items down you consciously recognize and acknowledge your success. If you’re familiar with git it’s like committing new items to a success repository inside your brain. As an outcome, your satisfaction, confidence, and motivation are growing.  

Satisfaction

The third inborn intention is Sense of Accomplishment.

mentalhealthstrength.com

It feels good to accomplish something, right? Every item in your daily success list is an accomplishment. No matter if it is small or huge, it positively contributes to the sense of accomplishment and maintains it with time. If you look back in the diary after 30 days you’ll get at least 150 items. Do it for a year and you’ll be successful at least 1825 times! 

Confidence

Have you heard of Impostor syndrome? It’s very common in tech and often can lead to lower self-confidence and belief in own abilities. The success diary helps here by building a positive track of records. When feeling a lack of confidence or fear of failure just open the diary on the last page and start reading back until the feeling goes away, it should help 😉

Motivation 

You did the exercise yesterday and you know you’ll do it again today, tomorrow, and so on. This habit motivates you to prepare for success! So you might take some extra effort or plan some wins for the days ahead.

How does it help leaders?

There are few more bonuses for leaders making their life easier at work.

First of all, for yourself, it helps to fight the lack of immediate accomplishments after transitioning from an Individual contributor role. I wrote a bit about it in my previous post.

Secondly, as a leader, it’s your responsibility to acknowledge and celebrate team success as well as to provide feedback, including positive ones, to your direct reports, peers, and managers. The success diary trains your muscles to spot success not only in yourself but around you too! So it will be much easier to provide positive feedback or recognize the achievements of others and will lead to better team morale.

My experience

I practiced the success diary for almost a year, every day, and stopped only when I felt I don’t need it anymore because I noticed I started doing it automatically in my mind. In the beginning, I was struggling to spot success. Sometimes I was staring at a blank page for minutes or stuck after 2-3 items. The key mistake was to look for huge or big wins only and to neglect smaller ones. After some time it got to the habit and I could easily write 5 – 10 items within several minutes. Moreover, I started noticing signs of success around me and noticed I have a better mood in general.


Is it cheating or gaming? No, I don’t think so, at least if you are being honest with yourself. It doesn’t mitigate mistakes or failures, it doesn’t keep you always positive either, but it supports you in stormy and good days as well as gives powers to support people around you. 

Tune your mind for success and enjoy it!